A Canadian Looks At How The 2020 U.S. Election Was Won

Photo courtesy of Pexels.com – Edmond Dantès

Two very different versions exist of the 2020 U.S. election. As a neighbouring Canadian I have taken an interest and tried to understand what actually happened. The whole saga is enthralling. It makes one wonder if a different story would have emerged if Elon Musk had bought Twitter two years ago.

I am deeply impressed by the reveal of a February 4, 2020 New York Times article, The Secret History of the Shadow Campaign That Saved the 2020 Election, disclosing in detail the strategy behind the U.S. election win. It is a breathtaking account of election engineering which is nothing short of profound.

Compare this with the Front Page Mag opinion article entitled, Yes It Was a Stolen Election, published on December 23, 2020 which tells what it was like to be on the receiving end of the election protection machine. This article is complete with 93 links to sources. Fascinating reading, both articles.

The New York Times documentary makes the claim that this magnificent effort was all about “protecting the election process.” This front doesn’t hold to the end of the article. It soon becomes apparent that the intent was to ensure an election win. Interestingly, many fell for the narrative, including some Trump supporters and religious leaders who got on board with “election protection.” Duping people into cooperation by telling them this is about preventing election fraud is clever indeed.

Here is an excerpt explaining what was accomplished in the name of protecting the election process. Note I have inserted a numerical outline and bold highlights.

Their work touched every aspect of the election. I. They got states to change voting systems and laws and II. helped secure hundreds of millions in public and private funding. III. They fended off voter-suppression lawsuits, IV. recruited armies of poll workers and V. got millions of people to vote by mail for the first time. VI. They successfully pressured social media companies to take a harder line against disinformation and VII. used data-driven strategies to fight viral smears. VIII. They executed national public-awareness campaigns that helped Americans understand how the vote count would unfold over days or weeks, IX. preventing Trump’s conspiracy theories and false claims of victory from getting more traction. X. After Election Day, they monitored every pressure point to ensure that Trump could not overturn the result. “The untold story of the election is the thousands of people of both parties who accomplished the triumph of American democracy at its very foundation,” says Norm Eisen, a prominent lawyer and former Obama Administration official who recruited Republicans and Democrats to the board of the Voter Protection Program.

The article is long and gives a very detailed account of how the election was won. It also reveals how 400 protest groups, ready to hit the streets, were told to stand down. They were only necessary to protest election fraud if for some reason Trump managed a win.

The article begins this way.

A weird thing happened right after the Nov. 3 election: nothing.

The nation was braced for chaos. Liberal groups had vowed to take to the streets, planning hundreds of protests across the country. Right-wing militias were girding for battle. In a poll before Election Day, 75% of Americans voiced concern about violence.

Mike Podhorzer is credited with being behind the election success. Although his primary objective is presented as election protection, he did serve as senior adviser to the president of the largest union federation in the U.S. where he was reputed to have used the latest methods, in particular data analysis, “to help favoured candidates win elections.”

Podhorzer organized a “well-funded cabal of powerful people, ranging across industries and ideologies, working together behind the scenes to influence perceptions, change rules and laws, steer media coverage and control the flow of information.” Ian Bassin, co-founder of Protect Democracy, ‘a nonpartisan rule-of-law advocacy group’, reported that, “Every attempt to interfere with the proper outcome of the election was defeated.”

Among the private philanthropy groups that stepped in to help was The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative that contributed $300 million and agreed to curb election misinformation online. To help prevent ‘election meltdown’ Podhorzer reached out to “members of the labor movement; the institutional left, like Planned Parenthood and Greenpeace; resistance groups like Indivisible and MoveOn; progressive data geeks and strategists, representatives of donors and foundations, state-level grassroots organizers, racial-justice activists and others.”

It looks like there were some tense moments in the effort to gain cooperation, as indicated by the report, “In November 2019, Mark Zuckerberg invited nine civil rights leaders to dinner at his home, where they warned him about the danger of the election-related falsehoods that were already spreading unchecked. “It took pushing, urging, conversations, brainstorming, all of that to get to a place where we ended up with more rigorous rules and enforcement,” says Vanita Gupta, president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, who attended the dinner and also met with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and others.”

All of this was designed to ensure that any claim made by Trump regarding election impropriety would be ignored and regarded as false allegations. In a March 3 confidential memo by Podhorzer on the topic of threats to the 2020 Election, he stated “Trump has made it clear that this will not be a fair election, and that he will reject anything but his own re-election as ‘fake’ and rigged.”

This was a set-up. It took advantage of two things, weakness in the electoral system, and Trump’s mistrust of those running it, and combined them to a spectacular end. Trump would be the villain no matter the outcome. Either he would be a poor loser who claimed the election was stolen or he would be the one who stole the election. In the case that the efforts to secure a Biden win failed, people were ready to hit the streets and create chaos. Buildings were boarded up in advance.

We knew exactly what Trump was going to do: he was going to try to use the fact that Democrats voted by mail and Republicans voted in person to make it look like he was ahead, claim victory, say the mail-in votes were fraudulent and try to get them thrown out,” says Protect Democracy’s Bassin. Setting public expectations ahead of time helped undercut those lies.

According to the article, Podhorzer’s game plan was five-fold: winning the vote was only the first step to winning the election. After that came winning the count, winning the certification, winning the Electoral College and winning the transition.

Rarely have I been as fascinated by an article or a strategy as I was by this disclosure of how the election was won. Read the Front Page Mag article I alluded to earlier, for comparison. Here is a sample of data reported in the article.

What happened in Georgia

In Georgia, illegal ballots were cast by, or in the name of: more than 2,500 felons; 66,247 underage voters; 2,423 unregistered voters; 4,926 individuals who had failed to register prior to the state’s voter-registration deadline; 395 individuals who voted in two states; 20,311 voters who had moved out of state and thus were no longer eligible to vote in Georgia; 40,279 people who had moved across county lines in Georgia without re-registering in their new county of residence; 30,000 to 40,000 people whose absentee ballots lacked a valid, verifiable signature; and at least 1,043 individuals whose voter registrations claimed postal facilities as their home address and disguised their box numbers as “apartment” numbers.[29] Almost all of the people in this latter category were absentee voters who cast their ballots early….

A vote update in Georgia at 1:34 AM on November 4 added 136,155 votes for Biden and 29,115 votes for Trump.[34]

Read both articles with an open mind and draw your own conclusions.

Senators overwhelmed by emails, calls pushing conspiracy theories about basic income legislation

The headline reads: Senators overwhelmed by emails, calls pushing conspiracy theories about basic income legislation

I’d like to take a closer look at this article, written for the government-funded CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) by a skillful journalist named John Paul Tasker.

First of all, to Tasker, why the attack on people who don’t want Universal Basic Income? Can we not all have our individual opinion?

To call thousands of people you have never met conspiracy theorists and then go to the further extreme of labeling them as mentally unstable (a reference in the article that compares letter writers to people who go through manic and schizophrenic episodes) is really not appropriate. An individual assessment is required by a psychiatrist or psychologist before such a life-altering diagnosis. Otherwise it could be considered slander. I might add that groups of people are not mentally unstable just because they disagree with, or do not fully comprehend, the actions the government is taking.

If the government wants to do a “study” it is because the matter is being seriously considered. Studies generally lead in a certain direction. And let’s remember the cost of these studies generally runs in the millions of dollars. So, if the government is not considering a basic income then scrap the study. But, as with the truckers protest, we can now expect the government to become obstinate. Because the protesters have to be wrong.

Some people got wind of this and didn’t like it and found their voice. It’s so much more convenient if nobody makes a fuss about what the government is doing, but unfortunately actions of the government affect us all. And fortunately we have a voice. Or so we have thought was the meaning of democracy—representative rule by the people. The idea of representing the people is falling out of fashion, however, and along with it democracy.

What is really scary for the government and the CBC is finding out that a “fringe minority” might be a bit more than a fringe. So, as a mechanism of defence it become necessary to find a way to discredit those who disagree. Make them look like de-ranged crazies. This is a particular skill of the CBC–character assassination. Read the sub-heading: “Red Chamber grappling with a flood of messages claiming basic income is a plot by a shadowy global elite.” How could anyone possibly think that our government or global elites are “plotting” anything?

Of course basic income is not a plot. It is a plan. Am I right about that?

And then we have a photo, in the article, of COVID-19 protesters, dated back to December 20, 2020 with a caption stating “One protester holds a sign referring to the ‘Great Rest’ conspiracy theory.” This refers to the book written in 2020 by Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum, entitled, COVID-19: The Great Reset, in which he talks about COVID-19 presenting an “opportunity” for a global reset. We have heard from Premier Jason Kenney that every premier in Canada received the book. I don’t exactly see how this fact qualifies as a conspiracy theory. However it could validates some of the fears expressed.

The author seems to dig himself deeper and deeper into the mire and anther example is a reference to LifeSite news, a conservative, Catholic news site, which, according to the CBC must not be believed, but none-the-less states exactly what we can find on the World Economic Forum’s website: LifeSite, a social conservative, anti-abortion website, has published a post on the legislation, linking Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland with the WEF. The WEF website states at the end of a lengthy bio that Freeland is “a member of the Forum’s Board of Trustees.” Let’s just add that there are more sources for information besides the CBC.

I recently did an article on my discovery of the WEF as a result of hearing Prime Minister Trudeau’s half-brother Kyle Kemper tell that Klaus Schwab is proud to call Trudeau his protege. There is video footage to support this. It’s not a big leap from there to imagine that this group of global elites—for that is what they are—might want to influence governments world-wide. Especially when you hear Klaus Schwab brag about infiltrating governments with young leaders.

The Great Reset is described in Wikipedia and the book is available on Amazon.

And as to the assurance of Kim Pate, Ontario MP who introduced the bill, that there would “absolutely not” be any clawing back of existing EI or Pensions, well, it is difficult to be reassured when in BC we were told we would absolutely not have vaccine mandates.

OK, I know that some are taking this a step towards basic income further than might be warranted, but they are afraid. They are afraid because we have had some pretty scary things happen in Canada. Our freedoms have been trampled on. You might have your bank account frozen if you support those who disagree with the government. You might be given a court order that disallows you to speak against the government or its mandates. And if we were to become dependent on a basic income then the government might one day decide to withhold funds because of such a thing as not getting a vaccine. See: National Post: Unvaccinated workers who lose jobs ineligible for EI benefits, minister says.

Klaus Schwab is famously known for saying, “You will own nothing and be happy.” Who is he talking about? What is he implying? A socialist form of government, maybe? You may want to check out his father Eugen Wilhelm Schwab, and also Freeland’s maternal grandfather, Michael Chomiak both of whom have Nazi ties. The WEF is an essential part of the UN and it cannot be denied that the UN has already influenced our public education, our climate change policy and our aboriginal treaty rights for better or for worse. The latter is being tested in courts.

I want to add that we may indeed be near the point of requiring a “guaranteed livable basic income” due to astronomical rising inflation. But CERB has shown us that an income supplement can be a disincentive to work. It also puts more money into the hands of drug dealers and increases overdose fatalities.

We know that home ownership in parts of Canada is already out of reach for a dual income family. Meanwhile large corporations like Blackstone, with huge buying power, are snapping up homes at an unprecedented rate and turning them into rentals in North America. See here and here.

These people sending letters are not all “crazies.” Some are actually very well informed. It turns out that much of what is being expressed is based on facts that are significant, especially in light of recent events. They consider the government and some news organizations as not completely forthcoming with the truth, I might add.

I think there is a better way of addressing the issue than continuing to aggravate people. It is true that some have been “broken” by covid. A few are believing clear fallacies. The first step towards helping people is validating their fear. Do we want to help these people or further alienate them?

For the CBC to print an article like this is only going to fan the flames. I’m surprised they don’t see that, unless it is their intent. Their descriptive of the people who wrote the letters is not too far from the truth about the CBC as well, “They’re trapped in their own echo chamber and they start to believe that everything outside of it is corrupted.”

See the article below.

Senators overwhelmed by emails, calls pushing conspiracy theories about basic income legislation

Red Chamber grappling with a flood of messages claiming basic income is a plot by a shadowy global elite

John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: Mar 31, 2022 1:19 PM ET | Last Updated: 7 hours ago

People participate in a demonstration in Montreal protesting measures implemented by the Quebec government to help stop the spread of COVID-19 on Dec. 20, 2020. One protester holds a sign referring to the ‘Great Reset’ conspiracy theory. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

Members of the Red Chamber have been hit by a wave of questionable correspondence from Canadians convinced that a pending Senate bill would take away their pensions and lead to some sort of totalitarian world government.

Tens of thousands of calls, emails and handwritten letters urging senators to oppose Bill S-233 have flooded into the Red Chamber. The emails — many of them based on outlandish conspiracy theories — have at times overloaded the Senate’s servers, bringing the normal workflow to a grinding halt.

Bill S-233 calls for the creation of a national “framework” to allow the federal government to begin studying a “guaranteed livable basic income” program in Canada.

If passed, the one-page bill, which was introduced by Ontario Sen. Kim Pate, would not establish a basic income program in Canada. It would simply compel the Department of Finance to study the concept and report its findings.

Under parliamentary rules, a senator cannot propose any new spending or tax increases through a Senate public bill like S-233. Moreover, bills of this sort — and non-government legislation more generally — rarely pass through both houses of Parliament into law. The federal Liberal government has also been cool to the idea of a basic income program.

Despite those facts, senators are grappling with a well-organized letter-writing campaign driven by people worried that the bill’s passage will somehow result in real harms, like an end to Old Age Security and Employment Insurance or the contributory Canada Pension Plan.

Some of the thousands of letter-writers also falsely claim that, if passed, the bill would limit future social welfare programs to people vaccinated against COVID-19, or that cigarette smokers will be barred from government assistance.

The bill would not make any changes to existing government programs and does not stipulate who would qualify if the government were to implement a basic income scheme.

Some of the concern about pensions and income support seems to stem from a tweet by Peter Taras, a former Ontario candidate for the People’s Party of Canada. He told his followers that, if Bill S-233 passes, “if you are not vaccinated you will not receive EI, CPP, OHS, Social Services or Pension that YOU PAID INTO.”

‘Fantastical and untrue’

That message has been retweeted more than 700 times.

Pate told CBC News that the tweet is “absolutely fantastical and untrue” and people like Taras are “spreading misinformation … that unnecessarily terrifies people by telling them their access to financial support and services upon which they rely would be terminated.”

She said it is “absolutely not” her intention to wind up any existing program.

Ontario Sen. Kim Pate in 2013. Pate said people have been spreading misinformation about her bill, S-233, which would prompt the government to study implementing a universal basic income program in Canada. (Colin Perkel/The Canadian Press)

“Bill S-233 would not claw back or reduce services or benefits meant to assist individuals with needs relating to their health, disability, retirement, etc.” she said.

“The bill proposes developing a framework for implementing guaranteed livable basic income, an income support program available to anyone living in poverty in Canada. In my humble opinion, it could form one component of a robust, responsive, and comprehensive economic, health and social safety net that includes housing, child care, education, pharma, dental and mental health care, as well as programs like pensions, disability supports and EI.”

Other letter-writers took an even darker view of Pate’s push to have the government study a basic income.

Alberta Sen. Paula Simons told CBC News she has personally received “thousands and thousands” of emails, letters and phone calls from people who say the bill is some sort of plot by nefarious actors to establish a “new world order” or a system of state surveillance.

Simons said she and other senators have had trouble navigating through their clogged inboxes. They’ve had to resort to other messaging platforms because their email accounts have become “functionally useless,” she said. The Alberta senator said her voicemail is always full because of the sheer volume of calls.

Fascists, Soros and cyborgs

Those contacting senators’ offices to oppose S-233 blame the purported conspiracy to destroy the Canadian way of life on a range of bad actors: fascists, socialists, the Masons, billionaires like Microsoft founder Bill Gates or investor George Soros, or World Economic Forum (WEF) head Klaus Schwab.

Others bizarrely maintain the legislation will lead to “transhumanism” — an alleged plot to turn people into cyborgs.

“This is CANADA . . . not North Korea, not Russia, you are employees of the people! NOT EMPLOYEES OF THE WEF OR THE WHO,” one correspondent told Simons in a recent email.

“Bill S-233 is just the beginning. We are losing our freedoms to a group of elites that want to depopulate and control mankind, enslave us to experimental transhumanism, and the removal of any Christian and Godly devotions,” said another.

“Nobody voted for Nazi Klaus Schwab. Nobody even knew he existed 2 years ago. He has NOTHING to do with Canada or any other country. Schwab holds a statue of Lenin in his office! This is NOT CANADA. We are NOT going BACK to NAZI GERMANY. Please see NUREMBERG CODE & TRIALS,” said one letter-writer, referring to the WEF founder who has been the subject of many conspiracy theories since the onset of COVID-19.

Alberta Independent Sen. Paula Simons gives an interview in a park in Victoria, B.C. on Nov. 30, 2021. (Mike McArthur/CBC)

On Tuesday, all senators got an email that claimed the adoption of a basic income program would lead to the forced sterilization of people of child-bearing age and the extermination of the elderly and the disabled.

Simons said an untold number of Canadians have been “manipulated and terrified” into believing “outrageous” conspiracy theories that are patently false.

“Since the trucker convoy ended we’ve been bombarded. There’s been just a really sudden, dramatic spike in letters and many of them are from people who are deep into a conspiracy theory spiral,” Simons said.

Politicians are used to getting messages and calls from people who are “unwell,” Simons said, but there’s something different about this campaign.

‘COVID has broken a lot of people’

She said the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting public health restrictions have wreaked havoc on mental health, priming people to believe claims circulating online.

“I really do think COVID has broken a lot of people. There is a real delusional paranoia that runs through some of this mail. They’re writing to me about how this is a eugenics plot, a Masonic plot and at some point you go, ‘OK, this is really upsetting that people are preying on people who are already vulnerable.’ This is a thing that happens when people go through manic or schizophrenic episodes.”

Beyond Taras, the failed People’s Party candidate, Simons said it’s not clear who’s behind the effort to convince people that S-233’s passage would have such sweeping consequences.

LifeSite, a social conservative, anti-abortion website, has published a post on the legislation, linking Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland with the WEF. That website also quoted former U.S. presidential candidate Ron Paul who has claimed that the WEF wants to introduce global socialism through a universal basic income.

Since the LifeSite post was published, Simons has heard from church and community groups that have sent in large batches of form letters.

The WEF, a non-governmental organization that hosts discussions between world and business leaders at an annual summit in Davos, Switzerland, does not dictate what will or will not become law in any country.

The ‘great reset’ lives on

But Amarnath Amarasingam, a professor at Queen’s University, and one of Canada’s leading researchers on conspiracy theories, said the WEF is at the centre of so many COVID-related conspiracies because, in 2020, some its leaders talked about a “great reset” after the health crisis — a chance to evaluate how the global economy is structured after grappling with such a devastating pandemic.

Amarasingam said some theorists see Davos as a place where evil elites “basically do their plotting and their criming.”

Protestors hold a banner reading “COVID-19 The Great Reset, Klaus Schwab” — referring to World Economic Forum chairman Schwab — during a demonstration against coronavirus-related restrictions in Amsterdam on May 2, 2021. (Peter Dejong/AP Photo)

“A lot of people think sinister elites manufactured the pandemic to bring about a ‘great reset,’ and make humans financially dependent on the government,” he said.

“There is a concern that the vaccines and a basic income are all woven into a grand plan to basically make us robots, cyborgs that will listen to anything these billionaire elites tell us to do. They think programs like a basic income will take away financial independence and that that’s part of a broader plot by evil-doers so that they can eventually have their way with us.”

Amarasingam said there’s nothing new about conspiracy theories but the pandemic has “pushed them into hyperdrive,” fuelling a movement of people willing to believe there’s a global movement to “enslave” humanity.

‘Closed ecosystems of thought’

A noted decline in people’s trust in government, the press, academics and experts and public health authorities has made the situation worse, he said, while the advent of alternative social media platforms like Telegram has made conspiratorial material readily available.

“These alternative platforms have seen insane growth. It’s created closed ecosystems of thought where people only trust what they hear from other people online. They’re trapped in their own echo chamber and they start to believe that everything outside of it is corrupted. There’s a growing proportion of people who just live in an alternative universe.”

Amarasingam said people in these online forums are largely unaware of how the government operates — or how a bill is passed through Parliament — and those knowledge gaps “are easily filled with fantasy.”

“It’s easy to see a sinister plot when you don’t actually understand how the government works. These people aren’t civics majors,” he said.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Paul Tasker

Parliamentary Bureau

J.P. Tasker is a senior writer in the CBC’s parliamentary bureau in Ottawa. He can be reached at john.tasker@cbc.ca.

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Shocking Cover-Up and False Allegations in Virgina’s Loudoun County

I was deeply troubled by the cover-up that occurred in a school in Virginia’s Loudoun County last May, as reported on November 3 in LifeSite News: How Youngkin soared to victory in Virginia. Below I will include a complete transcript of the article, in the event that the link is broken.

When a father came to the school because his daughter was raped in the girls’ bathroom, “by a skirt-wearing male” the school called the police on the father. Read the article.

What concerns me so deeply is that this incident did not fit the narrative the school is trying to promote, namely that this kind of abuse will not happen when bathrooms are open to persons who identify as the opposite gender. So the incident was ignored, dismissed, even denied. Meanwhile a father had to persuade the police, who came to arrest him at the school, that he needed a rape test kit for his daughter, the results of which turned out to be the damming evidence.

It gets worse. The father then became the ‘face of “domestic terrorism” at school board meetings (when he was) in fact the father of a young girl whose rape was inconvenient for the transgender bathroom lobby.’

More: Apparently unaware that Smith was the upset father of a rape victim, the National School Board Association (NSBA) cited his arrest at the school board meeting in a letter to Biden suggesting, “As these acts of malice, violence, and threats against public school officials have increased, the classification of these heinous actions could be the equivalent to a form of domestic terrorism and hate crimes.”

Unbelievable that the father of a rape victim could be framed as the face of domestic terrorism. When the facts don’t fit the narrative there is willful blindness.

NEWS

How Youngkin soared to victory in Virginia


A look at Glenn Youngkin’s victory, which showed the GOP what a culture wars-heavy victory can look like post-TrumpFeatured ImageVirginia Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin (R)Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images


Claire
Chretien

Wed Nov 3, 2021 – 5:39 pm EDT

Editor’s warning: The following article contains graphic descriptions and a video of a concerned mother reading from a pornographic book available to teens in Virginia.

ANALYSIS

(LifeSiteNews) – After a campaign emphasizing parental rights in education, businessman Glenn Youngkin won Virginia’s governor race last night, becoming the first Republican to win the governorship in more than a decade and signaling that the commonwealth is no longer the blue stronghold it was during the Trump years.

Pro-life and pro-family advocates say Youngkin’s defeat of former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who was governor from 2014 to 2018, show a path for future Republican victories. Leaning into the culture wars over education, Youngkin managed to keep support of the pro-Trump Republican base in Virginia while also picking off moderate Democrats and independents.

Liberal Fairfax and Loudoun Counties went 10 and 14 points more Republican than in the 2020 election, respectively.

The sea change is evident just in comparison to Virginia’s last election in 2019 when Democrats gained two state Senate seats and six House seats, thus taking both branches of the state legislature while also controlling the governorship.

Republicans also won back the House of Delegates last night. Democrats still control the state senate.

Education and Loudoun County rape cover-up

The scandals embroiling Virginia’s Loudoun County, which is outside Washington, D.C. and the wealthiest county in the United States, played important role in the race.

As revealed by the Daily Wire’s Luke Rosiak, a skirt-wearing male anally raped and assaulted a ninth grade girl in a bathroom in May 2021. The victim’s father, a plumber named Scott Smith, was arrested June 22 at a Loudoun County School Board meeting, where concerned parents opposed proposed transgender bathroom policies and the teaching of critical race theory.

Rosiak’s investigation revealed a stunning cover-up of the rape that included the Loudoun County Public Schools’ superintendent openly lying to the public about there being no bathroom assaults and has so far resulted in the resignation of one school board member.

One Loudoun school board member said he might not have seen an email from the superintendent about the bathroom attack despite having replied to it, emails obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request showed.

As Rosiak reported:

… immediately after the May rape, Ziegler wrote to the school board members saying, “The purpose of this email is to provide you with information regarding an incident that occurred at Stone Bridge HS. This afternoon a female student alleged that a male student sexually assaulted her in the restroom.”

Three weeks later, on June 22, Ziegler said in a public board meeting that “To my knowledge, we don’t have any record of assaults occurring in our restrooms.” None of the school board members raised the discrepancy.

When Smith had gone to his daughter’s school after she’d been assaulted, the school attempted to handle the case internally. Rosiak reported:

Scott Smith, the parent of the victim, previously told The Daily Wire that he was aghast to find the incident being handled only by people who worked at the school full-time — with the [school resource officer] seeming to take direction from the principal — rather than a team of police officers one would expect to find processing a major crime scene. There were no outside police or medics at the scene when he arrived, he said. He became irate.

He said that police responded to deal with complaints about him making a scene in the office, not to the rape allegations. Once on the scene, he said, the team of police eventually became persuaded that what had occurred was a serious incident that required their attention, and escorted his family to the hospital where a rape kit was administered.

Smith said he did not believe a rape kit would have been administered based on the laid-back way administrators and the SRO appeared to be handling it on their own. The county’s prosecutor later said that the case relied on DNA evidence, suggesting that if a rape kit had not been conducted that day, no substantiated rape would have likely been added to Stone Bridge [High School]’s books.

Apparently unaware that Smith was the upset father of a rape victim, the National School Board Association (NSBA) cited his arrest at the school board meeting in a letter to Biden suggesting, “As these acts of malice, violence, and threats against public school officials have increased, the classification of these heinous actions could be the equivalent to a form of domestic terrorism and hate crimes.”

Almost half of its state members have withdrawn or distanced themselves from the NSBA as a response to the letter. The NSBA has also apologized for the letter.

But just a few weeks ago, after the letter’s publication, U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland instructed the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to mobilize a “partnership” between federal, state, and local authorities to discuss “strategies” relating to handling alleged “threats” to educators from parents protesting controversial school content such as critical race theory.

Rosiak’s bombshell article “Loudoun County Schools Tried To Conceal Sexual Assault Against Daughter In Bathroom, Father Says” then revealed that the man the NSBA tried to make the face of “domestic terrorism” at school board meetings was in fact the father of a young girl whose rape was inconvenient for the transgender bathroom lobby.

Youngkin didn’t shy away from the issue, campaigning in Loudoun County and calling for an investigation of the school board.

“Instead of investigating parents, the Department of Justice should be investigating those who covered up a heinous crime in our school,” Youngkin said. “They not only covered up a heinous crime, they enabled an offender being prosecuted of sexual assault to attack again.”

Virginia public school libraries stocked with graphic books featuring sex toys, pedophilia 

In addition to racist curricula, parents spoke out against pedophilia-promoting pornographic materials being available in school libraries. This became more of an issue when McAuliffe said during a September debate, “I don’t think parents should be telling schools what they should teach.”

Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) ultimately removed “Lawn Boy” by Jonathan Evison and “Gender Queer” by Maia Kobabe from school libraries “until two committees made up of staff, students and parents can review the texts to determine if they are appropriate for school-age children,” The Washington Post reported September 28. “Parents in Texas and Virginia have alleged that two specific images in ‘Gender Queer’ constitute pedophilia. One of the images shows the adult author engaging in fellatio with a romantic partner who is also an adult, while the author wears a dildo. The other image shows a sexual fantasy of the author’s — in which an apparently teenage youth is about to engage in fellatio with an older, bearded man — that the book states was based on Plato’s ‘Symposium.’”https://www.lifesitenews.com/wp-content/plugins/lsn-media/assets/video-placeholder.jpg

“Terry McAuliffe showed us his heart when he said that ‘parents don’t matter.’ He immediately disqualified himself from office,” Youngkin responded in a statement. “I believe that parents matter, and I’ll never put government bureaucrats or politicians between parents and their kids.”

Social conservatives remain strongly opposed to the sex education curriculum at FCPS, which emphasizes transgender theory and sodomy. The county automatically enrolls all of its students in 80 hours of sex ed annually without parental permission. In one lesson for seventh graders, the term “oral sex” appears 11 times. Eighth graders are taught about “anal sex” 22 times and “oral sex” 20 times in one lesson.

Ninth graders are taught that teens can get prescription birth control without a parent. Tenth graders receive instruction on abortion and how to obtain one without parental notification or consent. All high schoolers learn about the daily sex drug PrEP (the School Board voted to promote PrEP to students before the FDA had approved it for use by minors).

‘A Tea Party for families is coming’

“Virginia voters, and particularly parents, made their voices heard loud and clear. Only a few weeks ago, Terry McAuliffe and Democrats were widely expected to coast to victory in a state Joe Biden won by 10 points last year. But then McAuliffe made a big mistake: he told the full, unvarnished truth about Democrats’ anti-family agenda,” commented Terry Schilling, president of American Principles Project (APP).

“That agenda has been fully repudiated,” he said. “Voters have rejected Democrats’ imposition of Critical Race Theory in schools. They have rejected Democrats’ radical transgender policies which would destroy girls’ sports and threaten the privacy and safety of women in their private spaces – and indeed already have in the cases of two high school girls who were sexually assaulted in Loudoun County this year.”

“But most importantly, voters have rejected the Democrat view that the education of children belongs to the state and its woke bureaucrats rather than to their loving parents. While that view may still be prevalent in the Biden administration and among many other left-wing elected officials across the country, Democrats should be forewarned: the tide is turning, and a Tea Party for families is coming.”

Failed race hoaxes

Perhaps sick of being called racists and domestic terrorists for opposing school curricula that teaches students to judge others based on skin color rather than the content of their character, voters did not fall for two race hoaxes right before the election. Days before the election, a small group of people dressed as white supremacists stood in front of a Youngkin bus with tiki torches, a reference to the Charlottesville violence of 2017. They were quickly revealed to be Democrat operatives, and the anti-Trump Lincoln Project took the blame for the stunt.

Then, on the evening of November 1, Twitter erupted over a photo of a man in a cowboy hat at a Youngkin rally with a Confederate patch sewn on the back of his jacket. The patch looked brand new, the man apparently stood in front of the media with his back to them for the entirety of the event, and none of the left-wing journalists who tweeted his photo bothered to ask him any questions or attempt to identify him. This, like the tiki torch stunt, was suspicious because the modus operandi for the left is generally to immediately attempt to identify people in such scenarios and “cancel” them.

The stunts did not get much traction other than on Twitter.

Alongside Youngkin on the Republican ticket were Winsome Sears, who beat far-left Democrat Del. Hala Ayala to become Virginia’s first female and black Lieutenant Governor, and Cuban-American Del. Jason Miyares, whose mother “fled communist Cuba in 1965 with the clothes on her back and no idea from where her next meal would come,” his campaign website explained. Miyares beat incumbent AG Mark Herring.

The Virginia Democrat Party also weakened its credibility on race when in 2019, Herring and outgoing Gov. Ralph Northam – both pro-abortion Democrats – admitted to previously wearing blackface. McAuliffe had called on Northam to resign but went on to laud him as a “great governor” in September 2021.

Voter suppression of maskless Virginians 

Many Virginians showed up to vote on November 2 shocked to hear from poll workers that they would be required to cover their faces to vote.

There is no indoor mask mandate in Virginia.

It became so bad that Christopher Piper, Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections, emailed poll workers at 12:06 p.m. reminding them that they were required to let maskless voters cast ballots at their appropriate polling places.

“We have gotten several reports of voters either being turned away or being made to wait until the polling place is clear before being allowed to vote if they refuse to wear a mask,” he wrote.

“You may not turn voters away because they are not wearing masks,” Piper chided them. “While masks are encouraged, every eligible voter is entitled to cast a ballot at their polling place.”

“It is not sufficient to offer curbside voting as an alternative,” he added, noting that Virginia law only allows curbside voting for voters with disabilities or over the age of 65.

Two prominent conservatives – Ben Domenech, co-founder of The Federalist and a FOX News commentator, and Matt Schlapp, president of the American Conservative Union, which runs CPAC – tweeted that they were ordered to mask at their respective polling places.

Virginia election commissioner reminds poll workers that they may NOT impose a mask mandate on voting in Virginia. If someone working the polls tries to suppress your vote, know your rights. pic.twitter.com/8Vp0BjNHhc

— Harmeet K. Dhillon (@pnjaban) November 2, 2021

Just got this text. They were trying to require masks at my polling place in a jurisdiction with no mask mandate in place. pic.twitter.com/WqgcyO4LYF

— Mark Hemingway (@Heminator) November 2, 2021

This is important information for Virginia voters. The Dep’t of Elections has also made clear to all localities today that there is no mask requirement to vote. https://t.co/8T2ngqPS6a

— Justin Riemer (@Justin_Riemer) November 2, 2021

To be clear, this is illegal voter suppression. You may vote at any polling place in Virginia — even in schools — with or without a mask no matter what local election officials tell you. https://t.co/YcOmPWFJnN

— Charlie Hurt (@CharlesHurt) November 2, 202

I was told at my polling station I couldn’t vote without a mask. Knowing what the GOP thinks about masks, isn’t this just an illegal barrier to voting? But I can count on one thing our judges will do nothing.

— Matt Schlapp (@mschlapp) November 2, 2021

FWIW I was told I had to wear one. “We’re requiring masks.” I didn’t have one, so they gave me one from a box. https://t.co/WBSgEdqxGp

— Ben Domenech (@bdomenech) November 2, 2021

My run-in w/ it was pretty odd actually. A poll lady insisted my 2 year old wear a mask in order for me to vote. I just flatly said “that seems unreasonable”; another volunteer came over and kind of hurried me inside

— Rebeccah Heinrichs (@RLHeinrichs) November 2, 2021

McAuliffe stressed his pro-abortion stance, ‘failed spectacularly’

McAuliffe emphasized his strong support for unlimited abortion, even doing a campaign event at an abortion facility.

McAuliffe ran hard on abortion—hitting the issue in TV ads, speeches, debates.

Media and McAuliffe said the issue could sink Youngkin after Texas’s 6-week ban took effect on September 1.

McAuliffe even campaigned at an abortion clinic. https://t.co/vUXrfVzq2Wpic.twitter.com/vLakNyIbdw

— John McCormack (@McCormackJohn) November 3, 2021

“Terry McAuliffe arguably made abortion the central issue in his campaign, and it failed spectacularly,” said Susan B. Anthony List President Marjorie Dannenfelser. “This is due in part to Glenn Youngkin punching back in his own TV ad and in the debates, defining McAuliffe as the real extremist for supporting painful late-term abortions. The pathway forward for the GOP in the 2022 midterms is clear: going on offense on life and refusing to cede the issue to pro-abortion Democrats is the key to victory.”

“Glenn Youngkin’s pro-parent, pro-family message strongly resonated in Virginia, and as our past polling has shown, it is also popular nationwide,” concluded APP’s Schilling. “Republicans have their blueprint for next year’s crucial midterm elections. We urge them to follow it, and we look forward to doing our part to ensure the electoral success of this growing movement in 2022 and beyond.”

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