What Canada Isn’t Doing that South Korea Has Done re COVID-19

Seeing that South Korea is logging a notable success rate in controlling the coronavirus, I’ve tried to investigate what they are doing and to compare the actions taken to what is happening in Canada.

Several things stood out for me in the article, Coronavirus cases have dropped sharply in South Korea. What’s the secret to its success? written by Dennis Normile on Mar. 17, 2020.

Note the following quote from the article and read each sentence carefully. (Underlines are mine.)

High-risk patients with underlying illnesses get priority for hospitalization, says Chun Byung-Chul, an epidemiologist at Korea University. Those with moderate symptoms are sent to repurposed corporate training facilities and spaces provided by public institutions, where they get basic medical support and observation. Those who recover and test negative twice are released. Close contacts and those with minimal symptoms whose family members are free of chronic diseases and who can measure their own temperatures are ordered to self-quarantine for 2 weeks. A local monitoring team calls twice daily to make sure the quarantined stay put and to ask about symptoms. Quarantine violators face up to 3 million won ($2500) fines. If a recent bill becomes law, the fine will go up to 10 million won and as much as a year in jail.

In addition I read the following:

Legislation enacted since then gave the government authority to collect mobile phone, credit card, and other data from those who test positive to reconstruct their recent whereabouts. That information, stripped of personal identifiers, is shared on social media apps that allow others to determine whether they may have crossed paths with an infected person.

Note that people who test positive leave a trail of possible places where the people they have encountered may have been infected. For instance, if an infected person goes to the bank, then buys groceries, then goes to a physiotherapist, then gets their hair cut, all of those people who served them are at high risk. This kind of information is not being shared publicly in Canada.

I was reminded of this image.

Related image

Paradigm InfoStream: INTERVIEW – Cat Tracker Researcher, Brandon …
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Today Canada is at approximately 1000 infections. If we follow the trajectory of other countries, we could be at 10,000 in seven days, and who knows what happens from there.

Last week I published an article which I have now removed. In it I spoke of minimum, to moderate, to maximum caution and protective measures. I believe it is now critical to practice maximum caution and protection to prevent the spread of the virus, as we have been instructed. But if we want to be as effective as South Korea in stemming the spread of the virus then we may need to be willing to implement similar measures.

Insurance companies are refusing to cover travelers who do not return to Canada during this epidemic, by categorizing it as an Act of God. If this is the case, then the following may be a good meditation:

If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and forgive their sins, and heal their land. (2 Chronicles 7:14)

 

Coronavirus in Canada- The Time to Act is Yesterday

We are assured by our Canadian government that the coronavirus situation is being monitored, however this is not the time for empty platitudes. I fear our leaders do not know the critical importance of acting in a timely manner but would rather collect information and discuss it on Friday.

Here is the latest serious admonition by health authorities regarding the coronavirus:

  1. The Canadian Health System has no give because hospital beds are at full capacity.
  2. It takes 20-37 days to shed the virus so it may still spread during that time.
  3. Hospitals are experiencing a shortage of protective equipment for staff.
  4. Laboratory tests are taking too long and increasing risk. Testing capacity is too limited.
  5. Infected patients must be kept separate from other patients in hospitals so they cannot use regular beds. Isolated spaces must be created with dedicated staff.
  6. Ventilators are critical for serious cases. Hospital stays for serious cases are approximately four weeks, with two weeks on a ventilator.

It doesn’t take much to imagine how quickly the situation could become unmanageable. This is the advice we are being given on what to do NOW:

With virtually zero spare bed capacity, Fisman, of the U of Toronto, said planners should prepare now for makeshift hospitals. There should be designated hospitals for coronavirus patients and registries of healthcare workers who have had the virus and recovered who can now work safely with patients.

Right now is the time to act on improving testing, creating isolated spaces, and procuring medical supplies and equipment for patients and staff.

We will need to determine when it is time to move from modest public health control efforts such as testing and isolating to more aggressive measures including social distancing or quarantine. In B.C. two schools have been exposed to persons with the coronavirus. We must take first measures and provide a place where infected persons can be treated without risk to others.