Organizing for Writing

As writers we are always collecting material. I have file boxes full of notes. Numerous computer files. Bookshelves of books. My brain is constantly coming up with new concepts to write about. New angles. New stories. I can’t possibly keep track of them all.

Between my electronic notes and files, and my physical files and notes, I sometimes am overwhelmed with all the resources I have collected. It’s as though an avalanche of ideas is always coming at me and I don’t have time to sort it all and to prioritize it.

I received the book Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, by Elizabeth Gilbert, from my son for Christmas. He knows I am a creative type as I dabble in art and music and writing. Incidentally, I finally found a template that works for featuring my photography online. You can view it at LensArt. What I was going to say is that Elizabeth Gilbert sees inspiration as a sort of entity of its own, like a “spirit” that makes an entrance into our lives and beckons us to follow it and create something. She also says we can’t sit idly and wait for this sort of inspiration to knock on our door. We grasp it when it does, but in the meantime creativity needs to find us busy working.

As I’ve already said, my problem is not that ideas don’t come to me. On the contrary, there are too many ideas competing for my attention. Too many projects I’ve started, and so many more I want to begin. My problem is more in the area of effectively working with my ideas and not losing them.

I’ve finally come to the conclusion that it is alright to have all of this evidence of raw writing material–files upon files, books upon books. For too long I compared myself with others who were not writers and who didn’t have this semi-organized chaos, and thought I needed to be like them. Then one day I observed that other writers did indeed have the same challenges I have in dealing with endless resources. I wasn’t some odd sort of hoarder. I saw that writers need a lot of material before we put pen to paper. We need lot of exposure to other sources. We end up doing a lot of gathering and collecting.

If only I had someone to help me with the task of sorting, organizing, storing and retrieving. What a luxury that would be.

In the early church there were theologians who had sponsors who enabled them to write because they provided them with scribes or secretaries and often paid their living expenses. I read about one church father, I believe it was Origen, who had seven secretaries at one time. Imagine that. In this way he was able to write reams of material.

Of course, back then all of it was done by hand. At least I have the advantage of a computer which, compared to handwriting or using a typewriter, is an incredibly useful tool, taking numerous hours off of my writing time. I don’t miss the days of pulling paper out of my typewriter and erasing.

Like most writers, I continuously face the tedious task of documenting my ideas and organizing and prioritizing them, without the aid of a benefactor or the assistance of secretaries. I’ve had to train myself to be alright with a bit of chaos when too much focus on cleaning up my reference materials takes energy away from actual writing. 

There is a sort of dividing line I need to be conscious of, an imaginary line dividing the past from the present. It separates the collected material from the collections I am working with.

When I write, I pull items forward from the past into the present. Some of my collected material is no longer relevant. It needs to go. Other material must be accessible, not lost in some slush pile–namely, a place from which it is never retrieved.

From time to time I need to go back into the past and remind myself of what is there.

Memory is an amazing thing, the way it retrieves information. But my memory  occasionally needs a little help and so I go back and review what I’ve written and stored.

I am determined to continue to work at implementing an effective organizational system. An effective organizational system is one where I can utilize material that is helpful and retrieve it when I need it.

Currently I sort documents into broad categories and sub-categories on my desktop, in Scrivener, in my email program (I email links to articles to myself), in online bookmarks and in my physical filing cabinet. I use Google Keep to take quick notes when ideas come to me. I have to consistently work to keep ahead of the clutter and remain focused on what it is I want to write.

Organizing is not an end in itself.  The result I am trying to achieve is to free up more time to write and to become a better writer. Keeping this in mind helps to protect me from what could easily become an obsession–organizing.

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About tinafriesen

I am a writer, artist, and musician. I create in the hope of making the world a more friendly place.
This entry was posted in Creating, Focus, Inspiration, Priorities, Research, Writing Helps and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Organizing for Writing

  1. S.E.May says:

    I have a great love of organising but it can take up far too much time. A while ago I took the time to get all those scraps of ideas and bits and pieces and put them all on my computer and then throw it into the cloud. There was a lot. Some were on post-it notes and others stuffed in boxes or written in loads of notebooks- so many notebooks. It took a long time but now it’s all in a file on the computer and I add to it whenever inspiration strikes.

    • tinafriesen says:

      Wow! I’m so proud of you! Did you set aside a certain amount of time a day? How long did it take you? Must be a good feeling. One day I hope to finish the task!

      • S.E.May says:

        It took almost 3 months and I would spend a few hours every morning going through note book after note book. I shall take a photo of them and put it on my blog. I kept them but all the contents is now in the cloud and organised and I can get out it with a few key search words instead of hunting through a notebook. I do think the notebooks are lovely though. There is nothing like browsing through years of thoughts.

      • tinafriesen says:

        You are inspiring me to do the same. It will be a big project. I’m wondering if three months will be long enough. It would be wonderful if I could actually finish in three months! I’m very impressed that you did it. =)

      • S.E.May says:

        You can do it. Keep us updated on your progress

      • tinafriesen says:

        Alright. This is going to be a challenge. Let’s see where I am in three months. Actually, I will be away for the month of June, so let’s see where I am by then. It would be a big relief, but to tell you the truth, I’d be impressed if I finished by the end of the year.

      • tinafriesen says:

        I just shared this with my husband and his response was, “Oh, honey. They don’t know what you’ve got. You don’t have enough life left for that. You just start from here.” Lol!

      • S.E.May says:

        I’ll be away in June too so I’m looking forward to getting back and hearing all about it.

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